Project

FIT4FOOD2030 | Fostering Integration and Transformation for FOOD 2030

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Uploaded by RRI Tools on 19 March 2018

English

TIME

From 01/11/2017 to 31/10/2020

Aims & objectives

The overall aim of FIT4FOOD2030 is to support the European Commission (EC) with the development and implementation of the FOOD 2030 research & innovation policy framework, to future-proof the European food systems.

The main objective towards that, is to create a multi-stakeholder platform – the FOOD2030 Platform.

The FOOD2030 Platform, connecting stakeholders at multiple levels (cities/regions, countries, and Europe), will make Research & Innovation (R&I) policies on Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) more coherent, build competences of current and future researchers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, and society at large, and raise awareness of FOOD2030.

The three inter-linked structures of the FOOD2030 Platform are:

  • EU think tank to act as a link between the EC and Member States & Associated Countries, with a global outreach
  • Policy Labs to increase and align public/private R&I policies/programs on FNS, building on and expanding existing national/regional networks; and
  • City Labs to develop/pilot action-oriented trainings for students, consumers, researchers and professionals linking Science Centres/Science Shops to networks of the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact cities.
     

Further objectives are:

  • To acquire insights into food system trends and related R&I policy frameworks, best practices (showcases) and future R&I breakthroughs;
  • To execute effective and targeted communication and dissemination activities adapted to different stakeholders and to develop a plan for continued communication beyond the project, thereby maximising the impact of FIT4FOOD2030’s outputs and policy recommendations.

Expected outcomes

The main expected outcome is a strong, tangible and sustainable contribution to implementing the FOOD 2030 policy framework.

To that end, FIT4FOOD2030 will create the FOOD2030 platform – a sustainable, multi-stakeholder platform, which mobilises a wide variety of stakeholders at the level of cities, regions, countries, and Europe.

The FOOD2030 platform will:

  • Strengthen R&I policy coherence and alignment, responding to a variety of actors’ needs;
  • Build competences of current and future researchers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, and society at large, and;
  • Raise awareness, of the FOOD 2030 policy framework specifically, and for the many food-related challenges in general.

Concepts & methodology

The FIT4FOOD2030 project is built on a number of central concepts and approaches that are key to the successfully establish the FOOD2030 Platform and which are integrated into a phased plan of activities .

Future-proof food systems

FOOD 2030 introduces a ‘food system’ approach which considers and integrates the entire ‘value chain’ from inputs, to primary production (agriculture, aquaculture and fisheries), harvesting, storage, processing, packing, distribution, waste streams to consumer intake and back. This understanding also goes beyond the production and delivery of a sufficient amount of food for all by including the provision of safe and nutritious food for healthy and sustainable diets in the long-term.

To become future proof, food systems need to become resilient and need to be able to tackle the joint challenges of climate change, environmental sustainability of food production and consumption, non-communicable diseases, migratory flows, emerging trade issues within and outside the EU, livelihood of rural areas, and interplay with the wider bio-economy strategy.

The food system approach helps to provide space for discussion on adaptation options to improve outcomes across the food system, provides a framework for the systematic analysis of the synergies and trade-offs of interventions, and serves as a ‘checklist’ to ensure that the right people are engaged in the discussion. [1]

Responsible Research & Innovation (RRI) and Open Science (OSc)

RRI is a dynamic, iterative process where all stakeholders involved in the R&I practice become mutually responsive and share responsibility regarding the RRI outcomes and process requirements. RRI activities aim to align a wide range of actors and activities involved in R&I processes towards desirable, sustainable and acceptable future outcomes. To reach these outcomes R&I processes must become:

  • Diverse & inclusive: from the outset involve a wide range of actors that engage in R&I practice, deliberation, and decision-making to yield more useful knowledge. In addition to involving NGOs and CSOs, FIT4FOOD2030 will also engage with consumers, citizens, SMEs, farmers, fishermen, educators, health workers, and others.
  • Anticipative & reflective: envision impacts and reflect on the underlying assumptions, values, and purposes to better understand how R&I shapes the future.
  • Open & transparent: communicate throughout the process in a balanced, meaningful way to enable public scrutiny and dialogue, benefiting the visibility of R&I.
  • Responsive & adaptive to change: be able to modify modes of thought and behaviour, and adapt overarching structures, in response to changing knowledge, and perspectives.

Our understanding of RRI also encompasses OSc, aiming to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to other scientists and society to better facilitate collaboration. Within the context of FNS, OSc entails the development of cloud-based data infrastructures to allow different stakeholders to benefit from the ‘big data’ revolution in a responsible way.

Community of Practice (CoP)

In order to ensure its continuation, the emerging FOOD2030 platform will need to become self-sustainable which will be achieved by using a CoP approach to network governance. Building a CoP starts with bringing together multiple actors who form a community around a domain of interest with a shared passion or a sense of urgency to progress together. The most successful CoPs (1) are driven by intrinsically motivated members (2) stimulate the imagination of participants and promote ‘out of the box thinking’, (3) are flexible and can adapt their activities according to the changing boundaries of the CoP, and (4) develop collaborative relationships and norms amongst members. Through such mutual engagement CoP members can create innovative solutions and new practices.

International collaboration

The project consortium has been put together with partners that can provide evidence of having a large number of collaborations with non-European countries and global oriented initiatives in the context of FNS. FIT4FOOD2030 project fosters a unique integration of existing and arising networks and infrastructures of which many are part of the consortium. There are strong links with the following:

  • Member State driven R&I programming initiatives that deal with FNS, such as the JPIs, the Standing Committee on Agricultural Research (SCAR), Partnerships for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) and private-public R&I programming initiatives, such as the ETPs Food for Life, the European Institute of Technology (EIT) Food, and the International Life Science Institute (ILSI) Europe. Importantly, a link to cities and regions is foreseen through the involvement of the MUFPP, bringing together world cities ever to foster food systems based on the principles of sustainability and social justice.
  • An international network on food systems research (SUSFANS) and food system innovation (EIT Food), that provides outstanding competences for bringing in state-of-the-art insights in food systems trends and research, (show)cases and breakthroughs.

Information sheets:

Policy Briefs:

Card Games:

Final Report:

  • Research & innovation for accelerating food system transformation. Operationalising FOOD 2030 through living labs - In this publication some of the key outcomes, lessons and recommendations arising out of the project are presented. A particular emphasis is placed on the findings and learnings of the project’s seven City Labs, seven Food Labs and eleven Policy Labs. These 25 labs built vibrant multi-stakeholder networks, developed visions for future food systems and experimented with new ways of carrying out research and innovation for food system transformation.

Article:

  • STICHTING VU, Netherlands
  • OSLOMET - STORBYUNIVERSITETET, Norway
  • AIT AUSTRIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY GMBH, Austria
  • FUNDACIO PRIVADA INSTITUT DE RECERCA DE LA SIDA-CAIXA, Spain
  • EUROPEAN FOOD INFORMATION COUNCIL, Belgium
  • ASSOCIATION EUROPEENNE DES EXPOSITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES TECHNIQUES ET INDUSTRIELLES, Belgium
  • INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE AGRONOMIQUE, France
  • NORGES FORSKNINGSRAD, Norway
  • ZORGONDERZOEK NEDERLAND ZON, Netherlands
  • FOODDRINKEUROPE AISBL, Belgium
  • INTERNATIONAL LIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE EUROPEAN BRANCH AISBL, Belgium
  • ALMA MATER STUDIORUM - UNIVERSITA DI BOLOGNA, Italy
  • STICHTING WAGENINGEN RESEARCH, Netherlands
  • EIT FOOD, Belgium
  • COMUNE DI MILANO, Italy

VU- Athena Institute

Prof. Dr. Jacqueline E.W. Broerse

E-Mail: j.e.w.broerse@vu.nl

  • Total cost: EUR 3 999 998,75
  • EU contribution: EUR 3 999 998,75
https://www.cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/212409_en.html

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