Library Element Report

Engaging the excluded. A perspective review

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Uploaded by RRI Tools on 17 November 2021
Last modified on 17 November 2021

ENGAGING THE EXCLUDED. A PERSPECTIVE REVIEW

This publication commissioned by Falling Walls Engage was developed and written by Rokia Ballo, researcher in Science and Technology Studies (STS) at the University College London (UCL) in 2021.

A PERSPECTIVE REVIEW ON HOW TO BETTER REACH AND ENGAGE WITH EXCLUDED COMMUNITIES

Where are we today when it comes to engaging excluded communities, often referred to as “underserved”, “underprivileged” or “marginalized”? This question is the topic of “Engaging the Excluded”, a Perspective Review mapping out the out the current state of inclusive Science Engagement. 

To accompany the launch of the review, Falling Walls produced “Engaging the Excluded”, a short film and resource for practitioners presenting key learnings and featuring the five projects cited in the review. 

Abstract

The need for scientists to effectively communicate and engage the public with science has never been clearer. The pandemic in particular has highlighted the long-standing inequalities present within society. However, ensuring communication and engagement are delivered equitably remains a challenge for practitioners. This perspective review begins by revisiting some of the history of public engagement and science communication, to offer a contextual understanding of where we are today and how the relationship between science and society has changed over time. This initial overview illustrates that historic global inequalities are embedded in and continue to influence modern science, meaning that many communities remain excluded from the construction, communication and use of scientific knowledge. The literature suggests that despite calls to democratise science and much theorising on how this might be achieved from those within science communication and public engagement, in practice their activities are often criticized for reinforcing patterns of exclusion found in wider society which particularly impact marginalized groups at risk of other forms of social exclusion. However, as the world continues to turn its attention to issues of inequality, so has the scientific community, with many already attempting to break down barriers to accessing science and foster inclusive engagement. This review concludes by providing examples of how inclusive practice is being employed across a range of geographies and cultural contexts: sharing key learnings from each to suggest how we might better engage the excluded with science moving forward.

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Definitions
  • Exploring how and why we began to communicate science
  • From attitudes and understanding to engagement and inclusion
  • The United Kingdom
  • Japan
  • Brazil
  • Learnings from the literature
  • CASE STUDIES: How can we engage the excluded?
    • Project: Fun Lab at The American University in Cairo (School of Science and Engineering)
    • Project: Bangalore X
    • Project: STEM in the Gorbals, University of Glasgow
    • Project: Open Science Hub Portugal
    • Project: The Tactile Universe at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography

 

Open
English

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